Optical Radiation, Including Lasers

Optical radiation sources are commonly found in all work sectors. Examples of sources include UV sterilisation lamps, Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), bar code scanners, intense pulsed lights for cosmetic treatments, and so on.

Optical Radiation, Including Lasers

Optical radiation sources are commonly found in all work sectors. Examples of sources include UV sterilisation lamps, Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), bar code scanners, intense pulsed lights for cosmetic treatments, and so on.

Lasers produce optical radiation, but are often referred to as being distinct and separate from conventional optical radiation sources due to their unique optical properties.

Assessing exposures to optical sources is often complex and requires specialist instrumentation, calibrated for the wavelengths for which measurements are being made. Exposures can also be estimated by theoretical calculations utilising safety standards.

The Control of Artificial Optical Radiation at Work Regulations 2010 (AOR10) requires employers to carry out risk assessments of exposure to staff from sources of artificial optical radiation (including lasers). This assessment may often require the theoretical or physical analysis of the hazard present. The purpose of the assessment is to determine whether the relevant wavelength dependent exposure limit values within the regulations are exceeded or likely to be exceeded. The regulations also require employers to implement control measures to ensure that the risks posed from any exposures are managed; and that training is provided to staff working with optical sour

Although AOR10 relates to uses of artificial optical radiation in the workplace, the requirements of general health & safety legislation also apply to employers.

There are also a number of international standards and guidance which provide good working practices for the use of optical radiation sources in the workplace. Examples of guidance include laser safety guidance produced by the Association of University Radiation Protection Officers (AURPO), and the Medicines Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) for the University and Medical sectors respectively. Guidance on training requirements for lasers in the medical sector has also been produced by the Society for Radiological Protection (SRP).

Aurora can provide the following optical radiation safety services:

  • Advice on the interaction, effects, measurement and assessment optical radiation.
  • Advice in order to ensure compliance with the relevant legislation, safety standards and guidance, including assessments of safety systems for optical products.
  • Assessments of safety systems and control measures installed for optical radiation systems.
  • Appointment and advice in the role as your Laser Protection Adviser specifically dealing with laser safety issues: classification, appropriateness and suitability of facilities, equipment, safety eyewear, exposure and risk assessments etc.
  • Physical measurements of exposures at customer’s premises.
  • Theoretical assessments of exposures from proposed or installed equipment.
  • Production/review of safety documentation with regards to equipment producing optical radiation, i.e. risk assessments and safety cases.
  • Optical radiation training.
  • Laser safety training.

Electromagnetic Fields and Waves

Electromagnetic and radiofrequency fields and waves cover a host of uses, which vary depending on the frequency of the fields and waves produced.

The Aurora NIR Team

The NIR Team comprises of Robert Hill, Lindsey Simcox, Angela Yeadon and Raj Bunger, a who are all recognised as experts within the NIR services field.

Contact us about our work

To talk to us further about our world-leading Optical Radiation, Including Lasers services, get in touch using the online form or call us on +44 1235 820049.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Glenn Hardcastle

Glenn Hardcastle

Director, RPA & RWA

Tel: 01235 820049 Email: enquiries@aurorahp.co.uk